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Appetite and Energy Intake Responses to Acute Energy Deficits in Females Versus Males.

Overview of attention for article published in Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, October 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#1 of 2,852)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
97 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
90 tweeters
facebook
10 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Readers on

mendeley
47 Mendeley
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Title
Appetite and Energy Intake Responses to Acute Energy Deficits in Females Versus Males.
Published in
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, October 2015
DOI 10.1249/mss.0000000000000793
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alajmi, Nawal, Deighton, Kevin, King, James A, Reischak-Oliveira, Alvaro, Wasse, Lucy K, Jones, Jenny, Batterham, Rachel L, Stensel, David J, ALAJMI, NAWAL, DEIGHTON, KEVIN, KING, JAMES A., REISCHAK-OLIVEIRA, ALVARO, WASSE, LUCY K., JONES, JENNY, BATTERHAM, RACHEL L., STENSEL, DAVID J., Alajmi, N, NAWAL ALAJMI, KEVIN DEIGHTON, JAMES A. KING, ALVARO REISCHAK-OLIVEIRA, LUCY K. WASSE, JENNY JONES, RACHEL L. BATTERHAM, DAVID J. STENSEL

Abstract

To explore whether compensatory responses to acute energy deficits induced by exercise or diet differ by sex. In experiment one, twelve healthy women completed three 9 h trials (control, exercise-induced (Ex-Def) and food restriction induced energy deficit (Food-Def)) with identical energy deficits being imposed in the Ex-Def (90 min run, ∼70% of VO2 max) and Food-Def trials. In experiment two, 10 men and 10 women completed two 7 h trials (control and exercise). Sixty min of running (∼70% of VO2 max) was performed at the beginning of the exercise trial. Participants rested throughout the remainder of the exercise trial and during the control trial. Appetite ratings, plasma concentrations of gut hormones and ad libitum energy intake were assessed during main trials. In experiment one, an energy deficit of ∼3500 kJ induced via food restriction increased appetite and food intake. These changes corresponded with heightened concentrations of plasma acylated ghrelin and lower peptide YY3-36. None of these compensatory responses were apparent when an equivalent energy deficit was induced by exercise. In experiment two, appetite ratings and plasma acylated ghrelin concentrations were lower in exercise than control but energy intake did not differ between trials. The appetite, acylated ghrelin and energy intake response to exercise did not differ between men and women. Women exhibit compensatory appetite, gut hormone and food intake responses to acute energy restriction but not in response to an acute bout of exercise. Additionally, men and women appear to exhibit similar acylated ghrelin and PYY3-36 responses to exercise-induced energy deficits. These findings advance understanding regarding the interaction between exercise and energy homeostasis in women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 90 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 47 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Norway 1 2%
Sweden 1 2%
Unknown 42 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 15 32%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 21%
Student > Bachelor 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Other 3 6%
Other 10 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 22 47%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 19%
Unspecified 5 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 11%
Social Sciences 3 6%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 814. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 March 2017.
All research outputs
#2,908
of 8,360,145 outputs
Outputs from Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
#1
of 2,852 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#128
of 244,470 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
#1
of 64 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,360,145 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,852 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 244,470 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 64 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.