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How Do Medicalization and Rescue Fantasy Prevent Healthy Dying?

Overview of attention for article published in AMA Journal of Ethics, August 2018
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Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
117 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
28 Mendeley
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Title
How Do Medicalization and Rescue Fantasy Prevent Healthy Dying?
Published in
AMA Journal of Ethics, August 2018
DOI 10.1001/amajethics.2018.766
Pubmed ID
Abstract

Before antibiotics, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), and life-sustaining technologies, humans had little choice about the timing and manner of their deaths. Today, the medicalization of death has enabled patients to delay death, prolonging their living and dying. New technology, the influence of the media, and medical professionals themselves have together transformed dying from a natural part of the human experience into a medical crisis from which a patient must be rescued, often through the aggressive extension of life or through its premature termination. In this paper, we examine problematic forms of rescue medicine and suggest the need to rethink medicalized dying within the context of medicine's orientation to health and wholeness.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 117 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 25%
Researcher 4 14%
Student > Bachelor 3 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Librarian 1 4%
Other 5 18%
Unknown 5 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 50%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 14%
Social Sciences 2 7%
Arts and Humanities 1 4%
Neuroscience 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 6 21%