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Changes in Parameters of Oxidative Stress, Immunity, and Behavior in Endurance Athletes During a Preparation Period in Winter

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, October 2020
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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19 tweeters

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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41 Mendeley
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Title
Changes in Parameters of Oxidative Stress, Immunity, and Behavior in Endurance Athletes During a Preparation Period in Winter
Published in
Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research, October 2020
DOI 10.1519/jsc.0000000000002780
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danica Michalickova, Rajna Minic, Jelena Kotur-Stevuljevic, Marija Andjelkovic, Nenad Dikic, Marija Kostic-Vucicevic, Ondrej Slanar, Brizita Djordjevic

Abstract

Michalickova, D, Minic, R, Kotur-Stevuljevic, J, Andjelkovic, M, Dikic, N, Kostic-Vucicevic, M, Slanar, O, and Djordjevic, B. Changes in parameters of oxidative stress, immunity, and behavior in endurance athletes during a preparation period in winter. J Strength Cond Res XX(X): 000-000, 2018-The current study monitored markers of immunological and oxidative status in 9 male elite endurance athletes: V[Combining Dot Above]O2max: 68 ± 11 ml·kg·min, age: 24 ± 2.5 years, and training loads: 128 ± 21 metabolic equivalents-h·wk during a 3-month preparation period in winter (January-March). Self-rated state of moods evaluation (by Profile of Mood States questionnaire) was performed, and blood samples were collected at the beginning and end of the study. Spectrophotometric methods and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay were used for parameters' determination. The level of concanavalin A (ConA)-stimulated interferon-γ (IFN-γ) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was increased (562 [147-852] vs. 1,097 [451-1842] pg·ml, p = 0.013). Also, the level of transforming growth factor-1 (TGF-β1) in serum was elevated (2.5 [1.4-5.1] vs. 7.2 [4.9-8.2] ng·ml, p = 0.015). There was no change in the level of peptidoglycan (PGN)-stimulated interleukin (IL)-10 from PBMCs. There were no significant changes in PBMCs proliferation/viability on stimulation with ConA and PGN during the study. No changes in superoxide dismutase, prooxidative-antioxidative balance, total oxidant status (TOS), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were observed along the study. Total antioxidant status (TAS) was increased (910 ± 174 vs. 1,090 ± 102 μmol·L, p = 0.018), and activity of paraoxonase (PON1) was decreased (523 ± 295 vs. 335 ± 183 U·L, p = 0.003) at the end of the study. Advanced oxidation protein products were increased (25 ± 7.9 vs. 42 ± 7.6 μmol·L, p = 0.011). The self-rated sense of vigor significantly declined (20 ± 2.1 vs. 14 ± 3.4, p = 0.045). In conclusion, 3 months of regular training in winter induced prominent changes in cytokines, biomarkers of oxidative stress, and antioxidative enzyme activity. These changes might increase susceptibility of athletes to disease and muscle damage and consequently lead to performance reduction.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 41 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 41 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 5 12%
Student > Bachelor 5 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 10%
Student > Master 4 10%
Researcher 2 5%
Other 7 17%
Unknown 14 34%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 6 15%
Unspecified 5 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 5%
Other 5 12%
Unknown 15 37%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2020.
All research outputs
#2,383,626
of 22,315,141 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
#2,090
of 6,297 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#48,493
of 298,270 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Strength & Conditioning Research
#29
of 93 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,315,141 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,297 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 298,270 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 93 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.