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Ice loss from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet during late Pleistocene interglacials

Overview of attention for article published in Nature, September 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
20 news outlets
blogs
6 blogs
twitter
151 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
84 Mendeley
Title
Ice loss from the East Antarctic Ice Sheet during late Pleistocene interglacials
Published in
Nature, September 2018
DOI 10.1038/s41586-018-0501-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

David J. Wilson, Rachel A. Bertram, Emma F. Needham, Tina van de Flierdt, Kevin J. Welsh, Robert M. McKay, Anannya Mazumder, Christina R. Riesselman, Francisco J. Jimenez-Espejo, Carlota Escutia

Abstract

Understanding ice sheet behaviour in the geological past is essential for evaluating the role of the cryosphere in the climate system and for projecting rates and magnitudes of sea level rise in future warming scenarios1-4. Although both geological data5-7 and ice sheet models3,8 indicate that marine-based sectors of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet were unstable during Pliocene warm intervals, the ice sheet dynamics during late Pleistocene interglacial intervals are highly uncertain3,9,10. Here we provide evidence from marine sedimentological and geochemical records for ice margin retreat or thinning in the vicinity of the Wilkes Subglacial Basin of East Antarctica during warm late Pleistocene interglacial intervals. The most extreme changes in sediment provenance, recording changes in the locus of glacial erosion, occurred during marine isotope stages 5, 9, and 11, when Antarctic air temperatures11 were at least two degrees Celsius warmer than pre-industrial temperatures for 2,500 years or more. Hence, our study indicates a close link between extended Antarctic warmth and ice loss from the Wilkes Subglacial Basin, providing ice-proximal data to support a contribution to sea level from a reduced East Antarctic Ice Sheet during warm interglacial intervals. While the behaviour of other regions of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet remains to be assessed, it appears that modest future warming may be sufficient to cause ice loss from the Wilkes Subglacial Basin.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 151 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 84 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 84 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 23 27%
Researcher 23 27%
Unspecified 9 11%
Student > Master 7 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 6 7%
Other 16 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 53 63%
Unspecified 13 15%
Environmental Science 5 6%
Physics and Astronomy 4 5%
Engineering 2 2%
Other 7 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 292. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2018.
All research outputs
#38,084
of 12,985,917 outputs
Outputs from Nature
#4,206
of 68,282 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,582
of 265,569 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature
#194
of 1,032 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,985,917 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 68,282 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 74.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 265,569 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,032 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.