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Be Careful Where You Smile: Culture Shapes Judgments of Intelligence and Honesty of Smiling Individuals

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 432)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
90 X users
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page
googleplus
2 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
75 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
198 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Be Careful Where You Smile: Culture Shapes Judgments of Intelligence and Honesty of Smiling Individuals
Published in
Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, December 2015
DOI 10.1007/s10919-015-0226-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kuba Krys, C. -Melanie Vauclair, Colin A. Capaldi, Vivian Miu-Chi Lun, Michael Harris Bond, Alejandra Domínguez-Espinosa, Claudio Torres, Ottmar V. Lipp, L. Sam S. Manickam, Cai Xing, Radka Antalíková, Vassilis Pavlopoulos, Julien Teyssier, Taekyun Hur, Karolina Hansen, Piotr Szarota, Ramadan A. Ahmed, Eleonora Burtceva, Ana Chkhaidze, Enila Cenko, Patrick Denoux, Márta Fülöp, Arif Hassan, David O. Igbokwe, İdil Işık, Gwatirera Javangwe, María Malbran, Fridanna Maricchiolo, Hera Mikarsa, Lynden K. Miles, Martin Nader, Joonha Park, Muhammad Rizwan, Radwa Salem, Beate Schwarz, Irfana Shah, Chien-Ru Sun, Wijnand van Tilburg, Wolfgang Wagner, Ryan Wise, Angela Arriola Yu

Abstract

Smiling individuals are usually perceived more favorably than non-smiling ones-they are judged as happier, more attractive, competent, and friendly. These seemingly clear and obvious consequences of smiling are assumed to be culturally universal, however most of the psychological research is carried out in WEIRD societies (Western, Educated, Industrialized, Rich, and Democratic) and the influence of culture on social perception of nonverbal behavior is still understudied. Here we show that a smiling individual may be judged as less intelligent than the same non-smiling individual in cultures low on the GLOBE's uncertainty avoidance dimension. Furthermore, we show that corruption at the societal level may undermine the prosocial perception of smiling-in societies with high corruption indicators, trust toward smiling individuals is reduced. This research fosters understanding of the cultural framework surrounding nonverbal communication processes and reveals that in some cultures smiling may lead to negative attributions.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 90 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
As of 1 July 2024, you may notice a temporary increase in the numbers of X profiles with Unknown location. Click here to learn more.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 198 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Portugal 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Unknown 193 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 25 13%
Student > Bachelor 23 12%
Researcher 14 7%
Other 12 6%
Other 43 22%
Unknown 51 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 70 35%
Social Sciences 15 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 5%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 4%
Other 27 14%
Unknown 58 29%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 268. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2024.
All research outputs
#141,810
of 26,329,145 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Nonverbal Behavior
#4
of 432 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,165
of 403,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Nonverbal Behavior
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,329,145 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 432 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 403,371 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them