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Bacteriophage Can Prevent Encrustation and Blockage of Urinary Catheters by Proteus mirabilis

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, December 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (74th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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7 X users

Citations

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59 Dimensions

Readers on

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118 Mendeley
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Title
Bacteriophage Can Prevent Encrustation and Blockage of Urinary Catheters by Proteus mirabilis
Published in
Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, December 2015
DOI 10.1128/aac.02685-15
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jonathan Nzakizwanayo, Aurélie Hanin, Diana R. Alves, Benjamin McCutcheon, Cinzia Dedi, Jonathan Salvage, Karen Knox, Bruce Stewart, Anthony Metcalfe, Jason Clark, Brendan F. Gilmore, Cormac G. M. Gahan, A. Toby A. Jenkins, Brian V. Jones

Abstract

Proteus mirabilis forms dense crystalline biofilms on catheter surfaces that occlude urine flow leading to serious clinical complications in long-term catheterised patients, but there are presently no truly effective approaches to control catheter blockage by this organism. This study evaluated the potential for bacteriophage therapy to control P. mirabilis infection and prevent catheter blockage. Representative in vitro models of the catheterised urinary tract, simulating a complete closed drainage system as used in clinical practice, were employed to evaluate the performance of phage therapy in preventing blockage. Models mimicking either an established infection, or early colonisation of the catheterised urinary tract, were treated with a single dose of a 3 phage cocktail, and the impact on time taken for catheters to block, as well as levels of crystalline biofilm formation, were measured. In models of established infection phage treatment significantly increased time taken for catheters to block (∼3-fold) compared to untreated controls. However, in models simulating early stage infection phage treatment eradicated P. mirabilis and prevented blockage entirely. Analysis of catheters from models of established infection, 10 hours after phage application, demonstrated that phage significantly reduced crystalline biofilm formation, but did not significantly reduce the level of planktonic cells in the residual "bladder" urine. Taken together, these results show that bacteriophage constitute a promising strategy for the prevention of catheter blockage, but that methods to deliver phage in sufficient numbers and within a key therapeutic window (early infection) will also be important to the successful application of phage to this problem.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 118 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Chile 1 <1%
Unknown 117 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 19%
Student > Master 21 18%
Student > Bachelor 18 15%
Researcher 17 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 3%
Other 10 8%
Unknown 26 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 20 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 7%
Engineering 8 7%
Other 19 16%
Unknown 33 28%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2017.
All research outputs
#2,864,052
of 25,374,917 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
#1,682
of 15,579 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#46,877
of 398,284 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
#43
of 170 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,917 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 15,579 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.2. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 398,284 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 170 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.