↓ Skip to main content

‘Does my Diet Affect my Perfume?’ Identification and Quantification of Cuticular Compounds in FiveDrosophila melanogasterStrains Maintained over 300 Generations on Different Diets

Overview of attention for article published in Chemistry & Biodiversity, February 2016
Altmetric Badge

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
10 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
20 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
‘Does my Diet Affect my Perfume?’ Identification and Quantification of Cuticular Compounds in FiveDrosophila melanogasterStrains Maintained over 300 Generations on Different Diets
Published in
Chemistry & Biodiversity, February 2016
DOI 10.1002/cbdv.201500064
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sofija Pavković-Lučić, Marina Todosijević, Tatjana Savić, Vlatka Vajs, Jelena Trajković, Boban Anđelković, Luka Lučić, Gordana Krstić, Slobodan Makarov, Vladimir Tomić, Dragana Miličić, Ljubodrag Vujisić

Abstract

Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) in Drosophila melanogaster represent the basis of chemical communication being involved in many important biological functions. The aim of this study was to characterize chemical composition and variation of cuticular profiles in five D. melanogaster strains. These strains were reared for approximately 300 generations on five diets: standard cornmeal medium and substrates prepared with apple, banana, tomato, and carrot. Differences in quantity and/or quality in CHCs were assumed as a result of activation of different metabolic pathways involved in food digestion and adaptations to the particular diet type. In total, independently of sex and strain, 66 chemical compounds were identified. In females of all strains, 60 compounds were identified, while, in males, 47 compounds were extracted. Certain new chemical compounds for D. melanogaster were found. MANOVA confirmed that CHC amounts significantly depend on sex and substrates, as well as on their interactions. Discriminant analysis revealed that flies belonging to 'apple' and 'carrot' strains exhibited the most noticeable differences in CHC repertoires. A non-hydrocarbon pheromone, cis-vaccenyl acetate (cVA) also contributed to the variation in the pheromone bouquet among the strains. Variability detected in CHCs and cVA may be used in the explanation of differences in mating behaviour previously determined in analyzed fly strains.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Serbia 1 5%
Unknown 19 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 30%
Student > Bachelor 4 20%
Researcher 3 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 1 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 20%
Chemistry 2 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 5%
Computer Science 1 5%
Other 3 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 March 2016.
All research outputs
#14,491,207
of 18,150,220 outputs
Outputs from Chemistry & Biodiversity
#735
of 1,385 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#192,085
of 272,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Chemistry & Biodiversity
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,150,220 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,385 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.6. This one is in the 8th percentile – i.e., 8% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.