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Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners

Overview of attention for article published in Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, January 2016
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Title
Resistance patterns, ESBL genes, and genetic relatedness of Escherichia coli from dogs and owners
Published in
Brazilian Journal of Microbiology, January 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.bjm.2015.11.005
Pubmed ID
Authors

A.C. Carvalho, A.V. Barbosa, L.R. Arais, P.F. Ribeiro, V.C. Carneiro, A.M.F. Cerqueira

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance in Escherichia coli isolated from pet dogs can be considered a potential threat of infection for the human population. Our objective was to characterize the resistance pattern, extended spectrum beta-lactamase production and genetic relatedness of multiresistant E. coli strains isolated from dogs (n=134), their owners (n=134), and humans who claim to have no contact with dogs (n=44, control), searching for sharing of strains. The strains were assessed for their genetic relatedness by phylogenetic grouping and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Multiresistant E. coli strains were isolated from 42 (31.3%) fecal samples from pairs of dogs and owners, totaling 84 isolates, and from 19 (43.1%) control group subjects. The strains showed high levels of resistance to ampicillin, streptomycin, tetracycline, trimethoprim and sulfamethoxazole regardless of host species or group of origin. The blaTEM, blaCTX-M, and blaSHV genes were detected in similar proportions in all groups. All isolates positive for bla genes were ESBL producers. The phylogenetic group A was the most prevalent, irrespective of the host species. None of the strains belonging to the B2 group contained bla genes. Similar resistance patterns were found for strains from dogs, owners and controls; furthermore, identical PFGE profiles were detected in four (9.5%) isolate pairs from dogs and owners, denoting the sharing of strains. Pet dogs were shown to be a potential household source of multiresistant E. coli strains.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 174 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 171 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 29 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 12%
Student > Bachelor 18 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 9%
Researcher 13 7%
Other 28 16%
Unknown 50 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 39 22%
Immunology and Microbiology 21 12%
Medicine and Dentistry 17 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 5%
Other 17 10%
Unknown 57 33%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 February 2016.
All research outputs
#19,945,185
of 25,374,917 outputs
Outputs from Brazilian Journal of Microbiology
#824
of 1,377 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#282,927
of 405,739 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Brazilian Journal of Microbiology
#20
of 40 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,374,917 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,377 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.6. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 405,739 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 26th percentile – i.e., 26% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 40 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 50% of its contemporaries.