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Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet: evidence from a nationally representative cross-sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMJ Open, March 2016
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 26,352)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

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Title
Ultra-processed foods and added sugars in the US diet: evidence from a nationally representative cross-sectional study
Published in
BMJ Open, March 2016
DOI 10.1136/bmjopen-2015-009892
Pubmed ID
Authors

Eurídice Martínez Steele, Larissa Galastri Baraldi, Maria Laura da Costa Louzada, Jean-Claude Moubarac, Dariush Mozaffarian, Carlos Augusto Monteiro

Abstract

To investigate the contribution of ultra-processed foods to the intake of added sugars in the USA. Ultra-processed foods were defined as industrial formulations which, besides salt, sugar, oils and fats, include substances not used in culinary preparations, in particular additives used to imitate sensorial qualities of minimally processed foods and their culinary preparations. Cross-sectional study. National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2009-2010. We evaluated 9317 participants aged 1+ years with at least one 24 h dietary recall. Average dietary content of added sugars and proportion of individuals consuming more than 10% of total energy from added sugars. Gaussian and Poisson regressions estimated the association between consumption of ultra-processed foods and intake of added sugars. All models incorporated survey sample weights and adjusted for age, sex, race/ethnicity, family income and educational attainment. Ultra-processed foods comprised 57.9% of energy intake, and contributed 89.7% of the energy intake from added sugars. The content of added sugars in ultra-processed foods (21.1% of calories) was eightfold higher than in processed foods (2.4%) and fivefold higher than in unprocessed or minimally processed foods and processed culinary ingredients grouped together (3.7%). Both in unadjusted and adjusted models, each increase of 5 percentage points in proportional energy intake from ultra-processed foods increased the proportional energy intake from added sugars by 1 percentage point. Consumption of added sugars increased linearly across quintiles of ultra-processed food consumption: from 7.5% of total energy in the lowest quintile to 19.5% in the highest. A total of 82.1% of Americans in the highest quintile exceeded the recommended limit of 10% energy from added sugars, compared with 26.4% in the lowest. Decreasing the consumption of ultra-processed foods could be an effective way of reducing the excessive intake of added sugars in the USA.

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X Demographics

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 941 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 935 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 162 17%
Student > Bachelor 119 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 86 9%
Researcher 75 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 53 6%
Other 157 17%
Unknown 289 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 166 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 138 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 78 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 50 5%
Social Sciences 36 4%
Other 137 15%
Unknown 336 36%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2557. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 July 2024.
All research outputs
#3,074
of 26,294,065 outputs
Outputs from BMJ Open
#4
of 26,352 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28
of 316,451 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMJ Open
#1
of 380 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 26,294,065 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 26,352 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 18.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 316,451 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 380 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.