↓ Skip to main content

Analysis and valuation of the health and climate change cobenefits of dietary change

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#17 of 77,120)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Citations

dimensions_citation
145 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
746 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
Title
Analysis and valuation of the health and climate change cobenefits of dietary change
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, March 2016
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1523119113
Pubmed ID
Authors

Marco Springmann, H. Charles J. Godfray, Mike Rayner, Peter Scarborough

Abstract

What we eat greatly influences our personal health and the environment we all share. Recent analyses have highlighted the likely dual health and environmental benefits of reducing the fraction of animal-sourced foods in our diets. Here, we couple for the first time, to our knowledge, a region-specific global health model based on dietary and weight-related risk factors with emissions accounting and economic valuation modules to quantify the linked health and environmental consequences of dietary changes. We find that the impacts of dietary changes toward less meat and more plant-based diets vary greatly among regions. The largest absolute environmental and health benefits result from diet shifts in developing countries whereas Western high-income and middle-income countries gain most in per capita terms. Transitioning toward more plant-based diets that are in line with standard dietary guidelines could reduce global mortality by 6-10% and food-related greenhouse gas emissions by 29-70% compared with a reference scenario in 2050. We find that the monetized value of the improvements in health would be comparable with, or exceed, the value of the environmental benefits although the exact valuation method used considerably affects the estimated amounts. Overall, we estimate the economic benefits of improving diets to be 1-31 trillion US dollars, which is equivalent to 0.4-13% of global gross domestic product (GDP) in 2050. However, significant changes in the global food system would be necessary for regional diets to match the dietary patterns studied here.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 900 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 746 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 12 2%
United Kingdom 7 <1%
Brazil 4 <1%
Poland 2 <1%
Finland 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Other 5 <1%
Unknown 709 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 165 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 149 20%
Researcher 134 18%
Student > Bachelor 99 13%
Other 52 7%
Other 147 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 162 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 158 21%
Unspecified 81 11%
Social Sciences 49 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 48 6%
Other 248 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2458. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 December 2018.
All research outputs
#344
of 12,285,205 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#17
of 77,120 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16
of 282,314 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1
of 1,049 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,285,205 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 77,120 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 282,314 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1,049 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.