↓ Skip to main content

Vitamin D status and its determinants in adolescents from the Northern Ireland Young Hearts 2000 cohort

Overview of attention for article published in British Journal of Nutrition, May 2008
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs

Citations

dimensions_citation
93 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
55 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Vitamin D status and its determinants in adolescents from the Northern Ireland Young Hearts 2000 cohort
Published in
British Journal of Nutrition, May 2008
DOI 10.1017/s0007114507842826
Pubmed ID
Authors

Tom R. Hill, Alice A. Cotter, Sarah Mitchell, Colin A. Boreham, Werner Dubitzky, Liam Murray, J. J. Strain, Albert Flynn, Paula J. Robson, Julie M. W. Wallace, Mairead Kiely, Kevin D. Cashman

Abstract

Despite recent concerns about the high prevalence of sub-clinical vitamin D deficiency in adolescents, relatively few studies have investigated the underlying reasons. The objective of the present study was to investigate the prevalence and predictors of vitamin D inadequacy among a large representative sample of adolescents living in Northern Ireland (54-55 degrees N). Serum concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) were analysed by enzyme-immunoassay in a subgroup of 1015 of the Northern Ireland Young Hearts 2000 cohort; a cross-sectional study of 12 and 15 year-old boys and girls. Overall mean 25(OH)D concentration throughout the year was 64.3 (range 5-174) nmol/l; 56.7 and 78.1 nmol/l during winter and summer, respectively. Reported intakes of vitamin D were very low (median 1.7 microg/d). Of those adolescents studied, 3 % and 36 % were vitamin D deficient and inadequate respectively, as defined by serum 25(OH)D concentrations < 25 and < 50 nmol/l. Of the subjects, 46 % and 17 % had vitamin D inadequacy during winter and summer respectively. Gender differences were also evident with 38 % and 55 % of boys and girls respectively classified as vitamin D inadequate during winter (P < 0.001). Predictors of vitamin D inadequacy during winter were vitamin D intake and gender. In conclusion, there is a high prevalence of vitamin D inadequacy in white-skinned adolescents in Northern Ireland, particularly during wintertime and most evident in girls. There is a clear need for dietary recommendations for vitamin D in this age group and for creative strategies to increase overall vitamin D status in the population.

Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 55 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 53 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 18%
Other 8 15%
Student > Bachelor 8 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 11%
Researcher 5 9%
Other 13 24%
Unknown 5 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 27 49%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Arts and Humanities 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 4 7%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2015.
All research outputs
#2,475,130
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from British Journal of Nutrition
#1,291
of 6,274 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,533
of 89,187 outputs
Outputs of similar age from British Journal of Nutrition
#14
of 69 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,274 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 89,187 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 69 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.