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Night Watch in One Brain Hemisphere during Sleep Associated with the First-Night Effect in Humans

Overview of attention for article published in Current Biology, April 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#3 of 6,871)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
270 news outlets
blogs
25 blogs
twitter
210 tweeters
facebook
25 Facebook pages
googleplus
38 Google+ users
reddit
2 Redditors

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Night Watch in One Brain Hemisphere during Sleep Associated with the First-Night Effect in Humans
Published in
Current Biology, April 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.cub.2016.02.063
Pubmed ID
Authors

Masako Tamaki, Ji Won Bang, Takeo Watanabe, Yuka Sasaki, Tamaki, Masako, Bang, Ji Won, Watanabe, Takeo, Sasaki, Yuka

Abstract

We often experience troubled sleep in a novel environment [1]. This is called the first-night effect (FNE) in human sleep research and has been regarded as a typical sleep disturbance [2-4]. Here, we show that the FNE is a manifestation of one hemisphere being more vigilant than the other as a night watch to monitor unfamiliar surroundings during sleep [5, 6]. Using advanced neuroimaging techniques [7, 8] as well as polysomnography, we found that the temporary sleep disturbance in the first sleep experimental session involves regional interhemispheric asymmetry of sleep depth [9]. The interhemispheric asymmetry of sleep depth associated with the FNE was found in the default-mode network (DMN) involved with spontaneous internal thoughts during wakeful rest [10, 11]. The degree of asymmetry was significantly correlated with the sleep-onset latency, which reflects the degree of difficulty of falling asleep and is a critical measure for the FNE. Furthermore, the hemisphere with reduced sleep depth showed enhanced evoked brain response to deviant external stimuli. Deviant external stimuli detected by the less-sleeping hemisphere caused more arousals and faster behavioral responses than those detected by the other hemisphere. None of these asymmetries were evident during subsequent sleep sessions. These lines of evidence are in accord with the hypothesis that troubled sleep in an unfamiliar environment is an act for survival over an unfamiliar and potentially dangerous environment by keeping one hemisphere partially more vigilant than the other hemisphere as a night watch, which wakes the sleeper up when unfamiliar external signals are detected.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 210 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 6 5%
United Kingdom 4 3%
Spain 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Switzerland 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Luxembourg 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
Hungary 1 <1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 103 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 24%
Researcher 25 20%
Student > Master 21 17%
Student > Bachelor 13 11%
Other 10 8%
Other 24 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 28 23%
Psychology 24 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 16%
Neuroscience 16 13%
Computer Science 7 6%
Other 27 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2448. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 July 2017.
All research outputs
#163
of 8,113,377 outputs
Outputs from Current Biology
#3
of 6,871 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12
of 271,054 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current Biology
#1
of 208 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,113,377 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,871 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 34.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,054 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 208 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.