↓ Skip to main content

Analysis of Cryptic, Systemic Botrytis Infections in Symptomless Hosts

Overview of attention for article published in Frontiers in Plant Science, May 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (69th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (87th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
9 X users

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
106 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Analysis of Cryptic, Systemic Botrytis Infections in Symptomless Hosts
Published in
Frontiers in Plant Science, May 2016
DOI 10.3389/fpls.2016.00625
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael W. Shaw, Christy J. Emmanuel, Deni Emilda, Razak B. Terhem, Aminath Shafia, Dimitra Tsamaidi, Mark Emblow, Jan A. L. van Kan

Abstract

Botrytis species are generally considered to be aggressive, necrotrophic plant pathogens. By contrast to this general perception, however, Botrytis species could frequently be isolated from the interior of multiple tissues in apparently healthy hosts of many species. Infection frequencies reached 50% of samples or more, but were commonly less, and cryptic infections were rare or absent in some plant species. Prevalence varied substantially from year to year and from tissue to tissue, but some host species routinely had high prevalence. The same genotype was found to occur throughout a host, representing mycelial spread. Botrytis cinerea and Botrytis pseudocinerea are the species that most commonly occur as cryptic infections, but phylogenetically distant isolates of Botrytis were also detected, one of which does not correspond to previously described species. Sporulation and visible damage occurred only when infected tissues were stressed, or became mature or senescent. There was no evidence of cryptic infection having a deleterious effect on growth of the host, and prevalence was probably greater in plants grown in high light conditions. Isolates from cryptic infections were often capable of causing disease (to varying extents) when spore suspensions were inoculated onto their own host as well as on distinct host species, arguing against co-adaptation between cryptic isolates and their hosts. These data collectively suggest that several Botrytis species, including the most notorious pathogenic species, exist frequently in cryptic form to an extent that has thus far largely been neglected, and do not need to cause disease on healthy hosts in order to complete their life-cycles.

X Demographics

X Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 X users who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.
As of 1 July 2024, you may notice a temporary increase in the numbers of X profiles with Unknown location. Click here to learn more.
Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 106 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Czechia 1 <1%
Unknown 105 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 20%
Student > Master 18 17%
Researcher 15 14%
Student > Bachelor 12 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 6%
Other 8 8%
Unknown 26 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 55 52%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 8%
Environmental Science 2 2%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 <1%
Other 10 9%
Unknown 28 26%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 May 2017.
All research outputs
#6,960,001
of 24,701,594 outputs
Outputs from Frontiers in Plant Science
#3,929
of 23,532 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#94,743
of 310,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Frontiers in Plant Science
#64
of 532 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 24,701,594 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 71st percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 23,532 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,794 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 532 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.