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The Impact of Varying Levels of Confidentiality on Disclosure of Suicidal Thoughts in a Sample of United States National Guard Personnel

Overview of attention for article published in In Session: Psychotherapy in Practice, September 2015
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Title
The Impact of Varying Levels of Confidentiality on Disclosure of Suicidal Thoughts in a Sample of United States National Guard Personnel
Published in
In Session: Psychotherapy in Practice, September 2015
DOI 10.1002/jclp.22198
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michael D Anestis, Bradley A Green

Abstract

Increasing rates of suicide in the military indicate current assessment approaches are not yielding accurate determinations of risk. Concern that endorsement of suicidal ideation may result in obstacles to career advancement may be resulting in nondisclosure. To test this, we recruited a sample of US National Guard personnel (n = 789; 81.7% male; 63.2% white) and administered two measures of current thoughts of suicide. One measure was integrated into our risk assessment protocol and soldiers were thus aware that answers could result in referral to on site military mental health professionals. The other measure was not integrated into the risk assessment protocol and soldiers were thus aware that results would not be reported to on site military mental health professionals. As hypothesized, a higher proportion of individuals reported current thoughts of suicide on the measure not integrated into the risk protocol (9.4%) than on the measure that was (6.0%). Also as hypothesized, a higher proportion of those willing to endorse current thoughts of suicide on the measure not integrated into the risk protocol denied current thoughts of suicide on the one that was (61.5%) than vice versa (39.0%). Limitations include cross-sectional self-report data and a lack of counter-balancing of measures. The results indicate that increasing the confidentiality of risk assessments within the National Guard increases the likelihood of reporting of current thoughts of suicide.

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Mendeley readers

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 60 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
Unknown 58 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 12%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Librarian 3 5%
Other 14 23%
Unknown 21 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 37%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Social Sciences 4 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Other 2 3%
Unknown 22 37%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 November 2018.
All research outputs
#19,944,091
of 25,373,627 outputs
Outputs from In Session: Psychotherapy in Practice
#1,621
of 2,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#191,646
of 279,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from In Session: Psychotherapy in Practice
#19
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 25,373,627 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,089 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.8. This one is in the 19th percentile – i.e., 19% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.