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Behavioral Neurobiology of Chronic Pain

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 351: ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION
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Chapter title
ENDOGENOUS ANALGESIA, DEPENDENCE, AND LATENT PAIN SENSITIZATION
Chapter number 351
Book title
Behavioral Neurobiology of Chronic Pain
Published in
Current topics in behavioral neurosciences, September 2014
DOI 10.1007/7854_2014_351
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-66-245093-2, 978-3-66-245094-9
Authors

Bradley K Taylor, Gregory Corder, Bradley K. Taylor, Taylor, Bradley K., Corder, Gregory

Editors

Bradley K. Taylor, David P. Finn

Abstract

Endogenous activation of µ-opioid receptors (MORs) provides relief from acute pain. Recent studies have established that tissue inflammation produces latent pain sensitization (LS) that is masked by spinal MOR signaling for months, even after complete recovery from injury and re-establishment of normal pain thresholds. Disruption with MOR inverse agonists reinstates pain and precipitates cellular, somatic, and aversive signs of physical withdrawal; this phenomenon requires N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor-mediated activation of calcium-sensitive adenylyl cyclase type 1 (AC1). In this review, we present a new conceptual model of the transition from acute to chronic pain, based on the delicate balance between LS and endogenous analgesia that develops after painful tissue injury. First, injury activates pain pathways. Second, the spinal cord establishes MOR constitutive activity (MORCA) as it attempts to control pain. Third, over time, the body becomes dependent on MORCA, which paradoxically sensitizes pain pathways. Stress or injury escalates opposing inhibitory and excitatory influences on nociceptive processing as a pathological consequence of increased endogenous opioid tone. Pain begets MORCA begets pain vulnerability in a vicious cycle. The final result is a silent insidious state characterized by the escalation of two opposing excitatory and inhibitory influences on pain transmission: LS mediated by AC1 (which maintains the accelerator) and pain inhibition mediated by MORCA (which maintains the brake). This raises the prospect that opposing homeostatic interactions between MORCA analgesia and latent NMDAR-AC1-mediated pain sensitization creates a lasting vulnerability to develop chronic pain. Thus, chronic pain syndromes may result from a failure in constitutive signaling of spinal MORs and a loss of endogenous analgesic control. An overarching long-term therapeutic goal of future research is to alleviate chronic pain by either (a) facilitating endogenous opioid analgesia, thus restricting LS within a state of remission, or (b) extinguishing LS altogether.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 53 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 53 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 25%
Researcher 9 17%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Master 5 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 9%
Other 10 19%
Unknown 6 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 16 30%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 15%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 5 9%
Psychology 4 8%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 10 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 September 2019.
All research outputs
#12,577,753
of 15,835,226 outputs
Outputs from Current topics in behavioral neurosciences
#266
of 363 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#235,403
of 343,901 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Current topics in behavioral neurosciences
#64
of 80 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,835,226 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 363 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 80 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.