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Pathogen-Host Interactions: Antigenic Variation v. Somatic Adaptations

Overview of attention for book
Attention for Chapter 4: Polymorphic Mucin-Like Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni, a Variable Antigen and a Key Component of the Compatibility Between the Schistosome and Its Snail Host.
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2 tweeters

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Chapter title
Polymorphic Mucin-Like Proteins in Schistosoma mansoni, a Variable Antigen and a Key Component of the Compatibility Between the Schistosome and Its Snail Host.
Chapter number 4
Book title
Pathogen-Host Interactions: Antigenic Variation v. Somatic Adaptations
Published in
Results and problems in cell differentiation, January 2015
DOI 10.1007/978-3-319-20819-0_4
Pubmed ID
Book ISBNs
978-3-31-920818-3, 978-3-31-920819-0
Authors

Gourbal, Benjamin, Théron, André, Grunau, Christoph, Duval, David, Mitta, Guillaume, Benjamin Gourbal, André Théron, Christoph Grunau, David Duval, Guillaume Mitta

Abstract

The arms race between vertebrate hosts and parasites has led to diversification systems able to generate huge repertoires of immune recognition receptors and antigenic variants. Until recently, the invertebrate immunity was considered to be poorly specific, and consequently, antigenic variability was not expected to be high for their respective parasites. In the present chapter, we show how the study of the interaction between the snail Biomphalaria glabrata and its parasite Schistosome mansoni has shaken this paradigm. We show that the fate of the interaction between the snail and its parasite is at least partly the result of the concordance of highly variable repertoires of immune recognition receptors in the snail and corresponding antigenic variants in the parasite. We call these antigenic variants of the schistosome Schistosoma mansoni polymorphic mucins (SmPoMucs). We show that their high level of diversification is the result of a complex cascade of mechanisms, thus presenting evidence for antigenic variation in a parasite infecting an invertebrate species.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 3 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 3 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 1 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 33%
Researcher 1 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 67%
Unknown 1 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 April 2016.
All research outputs
#5,722,479
of 7,560,115 outputs
Outputs from Results and problems in cell differentiation
#63
of 99 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#167,160
of 242,444 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Results and problems in cell differentiation
#2
of 2 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 99 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.6. This one is in the 30th percentile – i.e., 30% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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